Key Performance Metrics

Safety

Safety is a core value at Hawaiian Electric and at the forefront of all our activities associated with providing safe and reliable utility services to our valued customers and the community. We are committed to making sure our dedicated employees feel safe and valued while at work and return home safely to their families each day. For helpful safety information to protect you and your loved ones, refer to our safety and emergency guidelines.

Our commitment to employee wellbeing is to provide a safe and healthy work environment, where every employee wholeheartedly integrates safety into their daily responsibilities. Our safety programs, policies and processes are designed to ensure our team is prepared and trained to create safe work conditions, handle any dangerous situation, identify hazards, and prevent incidents. We take deliberate action to building a deeply embedded safety culture that aims for zero incidents and beyond, where all employees take ownership of continually improving their health and wellbeing, both in and out of the workplace.


Total Case Incident Rate

An essential aspect of preventing accidents and injuries, building and sustaining a resilient safety culture, and driving continuous safety improvement is to leverage data to assess our safety performance. Our safety performance reflects the success of our safety programs and policies. We are always striving to improve our safety record. We use a statistic called the Total Case Incident Rate, or TCIR, which measures how many work-related injuries and illnesses occur per 100 employees. This metric is used to measure the effectiveness of the safety programs and policies, as well as benchmark the company with other electrical utilities within the North American region.

TCIR is calculated as follows:

The number of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recordable cases multiplied by 200,000 productive hours (i.e. 2,000 work-hours per year per employee multiplied by 100 employees) divided by the total number of productive hours for the year.

OSHA defines a recordable injury or illness as a work-related incident which results in death, days away from work, restricted work or transfer to another job, medical treatment beyond first aid, or loss of consciousness. The lower the TCIR, the better the performance.

TCIR

Please click the button below for historical data for each island region as well as a consolidated Hawaiian Electric TCIR (in Excel format).

Download Historical Data


Lost Time Rate

Our safety performance can also be evaluated by using the Lost Time Rate (“LTR”) to measure any occupational injury or illness which results in an employee being unable to work a full assigned work shift after an incident per 100 employees. The LTR gives an indication of the severity of incidents occurring and is used to measure the effectiveness of the safety programs and policies, as well as benchmark the Company with other electrical utilities within the North American region.

LTR is calculated according to OSHA guidelines as follows:

The number of Lost Time cases (injury or illness which an employee is unable to work a full assigned work shift as a result of a work-related injury or illness) multiplied by 200,000 productive hours (i.e. 2,000 work-hours per year per employee multiplied by 100 employees) divided by the total number of productive hours for the year.

LTR

Please click the button below for historical data (in Excel format).

Download Historical Data


Public Safety Incidents

Public safety is an important responsibility, and one that we take seriously. Our performance in this area is measured by public safety incidents, which are injuries allegedly caused by and occur in connection with the utility’s operations and service that result in the injured being admitted into a hospital or a fatality. This excludes motor vehicle accidents involving utility equipment or facilities and other such incidents, when the utility operations and service is not the alleged cause of such incidents. This also excludes injuries and fatalities of utility employees and contractors that are constructing, maintaining, or servicing the electric power generation, transmission and distribution system (includes power plants, substations, and equipment related to transmission and distribution lines), as these are not general public incidents and are reported elsewhere.

TPSI